The Government has released it's second set of plans for the Sydenham to Bankstown Urban Renewal Corridor. These plans will significantly change the face and character of our suburbs, including Marrickville and Dulwich Hill.  

For maps of each of the precincts, visit - MarrickvilleSydenhamDulwich Hill

 

DULWICH HILL

 

What has changed for Dulwich Hill from the original plans exhibited in 2015?

- The number of dwellings proposed has been reduced by just 59 units, from 2,059 in the 2015 strategy, to 2,000 in the 2017 strategy.

- The boundary of the precinct has changed, with the northern side of Marrickville Road now excluded and blocks around the Arlington Light Rail Station now included in the precinct.

- Density has been redistributed in some areas, with some areas granted reprieve and others hit with higher densities (I've given a neighbourhood breakdown below).

- A community win, with new a new potential heritage precinct identified along The Parade.

 

Will my street be impacted?

I've broken down the impacted areas into four neighbourhoods:

1. Riverside Crescent and Wardell Road

2. Dulwich Hill Station

3. Dulwich Grove Light Rail Station

4. Arlington Light Rail Station

1. Riverside Crescent and Wardell Road

The 2015 strategy for the Riverside Crescent and Wardell Road neighbourhood slated seven storey development along Wardell Road, while Dibble Ave, the southern end of Ewart Street and the bottom of Riverside Crescent remained low density. The new plan removes the intense development along Wardell Road and instead hits all the streets in the neighbourhood with three-storey development. This means that we can expect three storeys on both sides of Wardell Road, Dibble Avenue, Riverside Crescent and the southern side of Ewart Street.

2. Dulwich Hill Station

Building heights at Dulwich Hill Station have been reduced in some areas and increased in others. There has been in a reduction on Wicks Avenue and the western end of Keith Avenue from four storeys to three storeys and from seven to five storeys on Bayley Street, Keith Lane, Bedford Crescent and School Parade. However, at Ewart Street, adjacent to the station, we can expect a building of eight storeys, which is higher than that planned under the 2015 strategy.

3. Dulwich Grove Light Rail Station

The neighbourhood to the west of the light rail line near Dulwich Grove continues to be hit with some of the most intense rezoning plans in the suburb. While there is some minor concessions from the Government, with heights on Garnet Lane, Myra Road and Terrace Lane reduced from four to three storeys, heights on Hercules Street are still planned to be a massive eight storeys and, despite a minor pullback, Terrace Road is still slated for five storeys.

4. Arlington Grove Light Rail Station

The change in the precinct boundary means that more areas between Arlington Grove Light Rail Station and New Canterbury Road will be hit by these plans. Heights along New Canterbury Road stay the same in the new plan, with eight storeys planned on the northern and southern sides of the corridor. There has been a big community win in this neighbourhood, with Beach Road and Durham Street rezoning plans abandoned. Around Arlington Grove Light Rail Station, there are plans for eight storeys adjacent to the light rail line and three storeys on Williams Parade, Constitution Road and Denison Road.

 

Are there any plans for new open space, new schools or affordable housing?

No. This plan is going to hit Dulwich Hill with 2,000 new dwellings, but there is no concrete plans for affordable housing and no commitment to new open space or new community infrastructure like schools.

 

MARRICKVILLE

 

What has changed for Marrickville from the original plans exhibited in 2015?

- Unlike Dulwich Hill, there has been no significant concessions made for Marrickville, with the new plan increasing the number of proposed new dwellings to 6,000.

- The new plans propose eight and 12 storey towers throughout the precinct (a neighbourhood breakdown is provided below).

- A community win, with rezoning plans at Silver Street abandoned and a potential heritage conservation area planned instead.

 

Will my street be impacted?

I've broken down the impacted areas into four neighbourhoods:

1. Carrington Road and surrounds

2. Southern side of Marrickville Station

3. Northern side of Marrickville Station to Marrickville Road

4. Livingstone Road

1. Carrington Road and surrounds

Carrington Road has see no change in the density around the Carrington Road Precinct and surrounding streets. The Carrington Road Precinct itself, as well as the industrial sites at the eastern ends of Myrtle Street, Hariett Street, Schwebel Street, Warren Road, Renwick Street and Cary Street are all slated for eight storey development. There is no transition in height planned between these current industrial sites facing Carrington Road and the residential streets behind.

2. Southern side of Marrickville Station

While there has been some reprieve in this area, with proposed heights reduced from seven storeys to four storeys on Ivanhoe Street, Ruby Street and Grove Street, this is counteracted by new plans for 12 storey towers on the northern side of Myrtle Street, Leofrene Avenue and Schwebel Street. Eight storey towers are also still planned for Charlotte Avenue, Riverdale Avenue and Grove Street.

3. Northern side of Marrickville Station to Marrickville Road

The northern side of Marrickville Station to Marrickville Road will also continue to see significant development concentrated on Petersham Road. Twelve storey towers are slated for Ann, Francis and Byrnes Streets, with Petersham Road expected to accommodate densities of between five and eight storeys.

4. Livingstone Road

The northern end of Livingstone Road has seen an increased height at the Marrickville Hospital site, with 12 storeys now marked to match the existing planned construction. Moving south along Livingstone Road sees a minor increase in the proposed development from four to three storeys at the intersection with Arthur Street, Harnett Avenue and between Glen Street and Illawarra Road.

 

Are there any plans for new open space, new schools or affordable housing?

No. Just like in the Dulwich Hill plans, Marrickville is hit with thousands of new units but no concrete plans for affordable housing and no new plans for the sports field, open space and schools our community desperately needs.

 

What can we do to save Dulwich Hill and Marrickville?

1. Share this information on your Facebook or social media pages.

2. Download the submission on the Government's Sydenham to Bankstown Urben Renewal Corridor proposals to have your say on the planning future of our suburbs. Submissions can be returned to my office, reply paid. 

3. Like my facebook page to keep up to date with the campaign.  

4. Call 9572 5900 for more information or email summerhill@parliament.nsw.gov.au

 

Please let us know your take on these plans! Send any feedback to summerhill@parliament.nsw.gov.au.